The Hurry Up and Wait Game

The hardest thing of all this moving on is the hurry up and wait game. I guess we did it to ourselves.

In the US, perhaps as with many other countries too, forgive my ignorance… we have to invest our money in a home in order to offset some tax burdens imposed on us. Same holds true with a business… pay yourself or pay the government.

Seventeen years ago we built our dream home. We had no intention of moving outside the US or traveling to the extent we are currently planning. If you had told me back then that we would amass a good amount of money, enough to live very well on, I would’ve laughed. Today this is very much a reality.

The biggest hang up is our business and building it works out of. I have no doubt that our home will sell quickly. The business is hit or miss. The building is also a major wildcard. Part of investing in our future has been making these investments. It is the time it takes to liquidate all these that is driving me crazy.

It is the hurry up and wait game that we are embroiled in currently. People inquire about the business, the building and what not. We answer these questions and nothing seems to ever materialize. The other day some “YouTube” guys came in and took a tour. They are looking for a studio to make their videos. Another guy came in and sat down in front of me until we had so much going on I had to excuse myself. Another guy has been texting and has a walk through and interview on Tuesday. I hope that in all this action some solid lead will come.

In the meantime we continue to move forward with decluttering years of possessions. The various pieces of local artwork from different countries where we have traveled all have to go. The nick knacks, furniture and household items we have accumulated must go. It is hard to put what worldly treasures you think you want to keep and someday be reunited with, in an assortment of manageable boxes.

What will life look like when we finally land and put downs some roots again? Will we be able to live on our own and be healthy? A deep down part of me fears growing old. Being alone someday. The life of  a Gay Woman, a Vagabond, an Overlander, a World Traveler… all come with a price in the end. Growing old and alone. Hey… it’s reality. No kids, no family but those you’ve met on the road. No roots, no foundation but the means to buy whatever happiness you can… and even now that isn’t always a given unless you carry around pieces of gold.

So now… sitting in my backyard, surrounded by sounds of the birds in our little piece of forest. Somewhere in a small mountainside in Utah, my home, the simple greens of our oak trees and aspens are soothing that turmoil of fear. Life is here and now. Sometimes, yes we must settle with hurry up and wait.

 

It’s hard to focus with a carrot dangling in front of your face!

Again some time has passed since my last post. Life has been a whirlwind of preparation and focus.

First there’s the house: we continue to prepare it for sale and eliminate the “clutter of stuff” we have accumulated over the last twenty six years. Paint, yard work, cleaning the little nooks and crannies that get forgotten… all to make the house more appealing to its future owners.

Second the business: we have had a lot of interest over the last few weeks, nothing solid yet, but I would concider them fairly promising leads. It is a battle of balancing the desire to move on, with the desire to focus and make as much money as possible before the opportunity to do so it gone. The hardest part is our employees. We never take it lightly that their lives also depend on our decisions. We are at a jumping off point after years of stress and hard work. We have set ourselves up and are ready for the next phase… as they are on the climb, raising kids, trying to make ends meet and depending on us, their job, and the income that comes from it.

Third is our health: this is perhaps the hardest since we are somewhat trapped in this life we have chosen and the stress that comes with it. There is no escaping the fact that that stress is eating us alive.

Forth The Adventure Cruzer: Lucky has been undergoing an extensive rebuild. She will be our life-line… our home… our mode of travel from point A to point B. As two women, we need to be sure that our twenty year old Land Cruiser will be reliable and instill confidence to go Overlanding in Central America.

Fifth Financial and Tax planning: this is the hardest. One mistake could cost us thousands of dollars. Thousands of dollars could shorten our ability to live comfortably and the ability to do what we choose to instead of being stressed over money. Taxes… this is the ugly five letter word. If we can lessen our tax burden for the next twenty years, we can enjoy more of our hard earned money vs giving it back to a corrupt government that refuses to care about the environment, it’s people, or the future.

As you can see our plates have been full. This is only the beginning too. There are so many things we still need to do to prepare… But it’s hard to focus with a carrot dangling in front of your face.

A Weekend Getaway

We jetted off to Grand Junction Colorado this weekend. The fun of being able to do this is a privilege earned by lots of hard work and lots of Delta Skymiles.

There is something healing about a weekend in the red rock desert. Luckily we live close to this wonderland of exploration and an arid land full of life.

The thing that always strikes me is the amount of life that eeks its way out of a seemingly desolate environment. The cacti were sporting their paper-like blooms of white, pink, yellow and red. The Columbine’s soft peach colored blooms stand tall against the red sand. Daisys sway in the canyon breezes.

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It always amazes me when a small river has found its way in the desert flowing through the sandstone and quartz meandering from shady spot to shady spot, cascading over the rocky ground. It is from these small streams that man can attempt to tame this desert and make a living mining the wealth and raising small herds of sustinance livestock. It is also where the bandidos of the great western age would hide out.

The rejuvenation that comes from even a few days is well worth the slight hassle of getting there.

A Proud People

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Weekly Photo Challenge

Overlanding Expo May 2017

I don’t know who coined the phrase “half of the experience is the journey itself”, but they hit that nail dead on the head. We started packing last weekend. The Cruzer is taking some getting used to but she is capable of handling our gear. The way I figure it… I pretty much have everything I need to be self sufficient for several days.

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What’s the difference between a trip for several days vs. several months? Not too much. If you were living on the road, the road would be your home and you would need to stop and do laundry once a week, or so, just like you do in your brick and mortar home. I think you generally just stink and after while don’t notice. Ha! What a thought. So you don’t need to own but maybe two weeks worth of clothes… and I’m not talking three changes a day… think about it; what do you really need if it’s 50-100 degrees everyday. A chance of rain half the year. Twelve hours of daylight on average per day.

Food? Well unless you’re going down the Colorado through the Grand Canyon by paddle boat, you can go to the market once or twice a week and buy fresh. We don’t have a full on refrigerator after all. If you go camping for a week you go to one place and hopefully have enough food and ice to keep it cold. So there you have it.

One thing I would have to do though is organize the Cruzer. It was frustrating trying to find anything. I had to do a lot of climbing around and rummaging to find things I knew I had put in there somewhere. Oh well… duality noted. I think we will need to build compartments. That’s what I hope to bring home from the Expo.

Part Two: The Revelations:
First let me start by saying going to the Expo was a great thing! I met some genuine people there. The camp area was packed tight with all types of rigs from VW Buses to Hummers to Land Cruisers. All the rigs had basically the same equipment. Tents of all types and sizes. Gear necessary to support it’s occupants for a trip into the wild. Varying degrees of sophistication. Some old and some newer. Some costing thousands of dollars to build to several hundreds of thousands. What did each have in common? The owners and travelers desire to be self sufficient with the ability to escape the realm of responsible reality.

I was lucky to get some great neighbors on each side. The most memorable will be Mona and Al from San Francisco area originally.
To say they took a blow on the chin and continued to turn the other cheek would be an understatement. They lost their home in the fires that ravaged the area a few years ago. Still they remained hopeful and positive, and picked up what they had left and continued moving forward instead of becoming “victims”. They reminded me so much of Chris and I it was amazing. They complimented each other, obviously loved each other and yet were so totally opposite of each other. I think that is the greatest strength of any healthy, life long relationship. Mona and Al took me in and we became good friends in the short time we spent together. They have big plans for escaping just as Chris and I do.

I attended many seminars, Q&As, demonstrations and took from each a bit of vital information and revelations. I really enjoyed speaking with real people that have actually done what we are preparing to do. The greatest part was that maybe learning from them and their experiences, we can avoid some costly mistakes.

I got to experience the life of “up at sunrise and to bed at sunset”. I got to pick people’s brains on a personal one to one basis. I was taught as a student and was showed things I never would have known otherwise. I gained a confidence in what our future may look like. I came home with so many great, doable ideas and how to put them into something tangible that will increase our chances of survival as two women alone on our Overland voyage.

The best part of it all was when Chris finally joined me on Saturday night. There was no way I could show her all I had learned but I took her around and showed her it was possible. Our dream could come to fruition with the knowledge of those who have been doing the minimalist life style for years and years. I was able to get her buy in 100% to building our “home” on the road. We discussed at length weather or not we had the right vehicle. We discussed other possibilities if money was no option. In the end I told her I would design Lucky’s interior and before it went into production get her buy in.

Leaving on Sunday was bitter sweet. I had to say goodbye to my new friends. Pack up all our soon to be “worldly possessions” and hit the road for the long journey home. This 8 hours was the longest Chris and I had spent without the TV on, faces in our phones or iPads in a long while. It was the quality time we needed to do what we do best… discuss our ideas, hash out our differences and compromise.

The next phase will begin as I draw out my ideas about how we need to improve our home with the knowledge I gained from veterans who have gone before. Hopefully learn from their mistakes and leap into the next stage of our lives with a better knowledge and understanding of what could lie ahead. I feel it will be easier for us to transition into life on the road without time limitations and the burden of owning anything except what is “on our backs” as it were.

In conclusion, this was an enlightening weekend. It was a necessary step in the right direction. It affirmed this journey as possible. It drilled into my brain the realities of the dangers and enjoyment one can encounter when all ties are broken and life is lived not just endured.

“We travel not to escape life… but for life not to escape us”.